Colorectal Cancer Mortality Rates by County, African Americans, 2000-2009

Data Source: NVSS-M (CDC/NCHS); Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010 (CDC, Census, CDC/NCHS and Census, CDC/NCHS)

About 189,910 new cancer cases were expected to be diagnosed among blacks in 2016. The most commonly diagnosed cancers among black men are prostate (31% of all cancers), lung (15%), and colon and rectum (9%). Among black women, the most common cancers are breast (32% of all cancers), lung (11%), and colon and rectum (9%).

African-Americans have the highest mortality rate among cancer patients nationwide. According to the Colorectal Cancer Mortality Rates by County, African Americans, 2000-2009, in the State of Tennessee, the western counties have the highest recorded cancer patients. Studies show that there are several reasons behind this fact. Some of the reasons are: Not being diagnosed in the initial stages (getting to the doctor at the onset of cancer) and physicians sharing treatment options.